1. fedoraharp:

carnivalofwonder:

voiceofdesert-bluffs:

warpfactornope:

bulletproofteacup:

This scene still breaks my heart each and every single time I watch it.
Azula was a terrible, horrible person. She would have set the world aflame and laughed over the broken carcass of her brother.
But she was fourteen.
She was so ruined and twisted by her childhood and by her nation, driven to insanity by the expectations placed upon her.
Azula was bad and yet I can’t help but feel so terribly sorry for her.

"I don’t have sob stories like all of you."

SHE WAS FUCKING FOURTEEN WHAT

"My own mother….thought I was a monster.She was right, of course, but it still hurt.”

actually, i think one of the shows strengths is that they didn’t shy away from what a horrible tragedy this was. even though she was clearly a villain and did unspeakably awful things, this scene was still framed as sad. there was no celebrating- they just look at her sadly.
the music for the battle that leads up to this moment is sad too- it’s an epic battle, visually probably one of the biggest things done in the entire series, and they could have played it with thumping, energetic, dangerous music. but instead it’s quiet and somber. because the whole scenario is heartbreaking, and they know it.
i think the fact that a kid’s show had so much respect for it’s viewers and their ability to understand the complexity of this situation is what makes avatar great.

    fedoraharp:

    carnivalofwonder:

    voiceofdesert-bluffs:

    warpfactornope:

    bulletproofteacup:

    This scene still breaks my heart each and every single time I watch it.

    Azula was a terrible, horrible person. She would have set the world aflame and laughed over the broken carcass of her brother.

    But she was fourteen.

    She was so ruined and twisted by her childhood and by her nation, driven to insanity by the expectations placed upon her.

    Azula was bad and yet I can’t help but feel so terribly sorry for her.

    "I don’t have sob stories like all of you."

    SHE WAS FUCKING FOURTEEN WHAT

    "My own mother….thought I was a monster.
    She was right, of course, but it still hurt.”

    actually, i think one of the shows strengths is that they didn’t shy away from what a horrible tragedy this was. even though she was clearly a villain and did unspeakably awful things, this scene was still framed as sad. there was no celebrating- they just look at her sadly.

    the music for the battle that leads up to this moment is sad too- it’s an epic battle, visually probably one of the biggest things done in the entire series, and they could have played it with thumping, energetic, dangerous music. but instead it’s quiet and somber. because the whole scenario is heartbreaking, and they know it.

    i think the fact that a kid’s show had so much respect for it’s viewers and their ability to understand the complexity of this situation is what makes avatar great.

    (via monkeysaysficus)

    5 hours ago  /  144,476 notes

  2. steelcandy:

Avatar: The Last Airbender ‘The Four Nations’ engagement rings!
AirEarthFireWaterWhite lotus (transcending the boundaries of the four nations)
(made on gemvara.com by steel candy)

    steelcandy:

    Avatar: The Last Airbender ‘The Four Nations’ engagement rings!

    Air
    Earth
    Fire
    Water
    White lotus (transcending the boundaries of the four nations)

    (made on gemvara.com by steel candy)

    6 hours ago  /  35,704 notes  /  Source: steelcandy

  3. Anonymous said: What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

    middleclassreject:

    dysonrules:

    aconissa:

    50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

    It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

    While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

    Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

    It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

    REBLOG FOREVER.

    Boycott this fucking movie, for the love of god. These kinds of ideas are dangerous and set us back as a society 

    9 hours ago  /  24,789 notes  /  Source: aconissa

  4. She was 18 years old, a freshman, and had been on campus for just two weeks when one Saturday night last September her friends grew worried because she had been drinking and suddenly disappeared.

    Around midnight, the missing girl texted a friend, saying she was frightened by a student she had met that evening. “Idk what to do,” she wrote. “I’m scared.” When she did not answer a call, the friend began searching for her.

    In the early-morning hours on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges in central New York, the friend said, he found her — bent over a pool table as a football player appeared to be sexually assaulting her from behind in a darkened dance hall with six or seven people watching and laughing. Some had their cellphones out, apparently taking pictures, he said.

    Later, records show, a sexual-assault nurse offered this preliminary assessment: blunt force trauma within the last 24 hours indicating “intercourse with either multiple partners, multiple times or that the intercourse was very forceful.” The student said she could not recall the pool table encounter, but did remember being raped earlier in a fraternity-house bedroom.

    The football player at the pool table had also been at the fraternity house — in both places with his pants down — but denied raping her, saying he was too tired after a football game to get an erection. Two other players, also accused of sexually assaulting the woman, denied the charge as well. Even so, tests later found sperm or semen in her vagina, in her rectum and on her underwear.

    It took the college just 12 days to investigate the rape report, hold a hearing and clear the football players. The football team went on to finish undefeated in its conference, while the woman was left, she said, to face the consequences — threats and harassment for accusing members of the most popular sports team on campus.

    A New York Times examination of the case, based in part on hundreds of pages of disciplinary proceedings — usually confidential under federal privacy laws — offers a rare look inside one school’s adjudication of a rape complaint amid a roiling national debate over how best to stop sexual assaults on campuses.

    Whatever precisely happened that September night, the internal records, along with interviews with students, sexual-assault experts and college officials, depict a school ill prepared to evaluate an allegation so serious that, if proved in a court of law, would be a felony, with a likely prison sentence. As the case illustrates, school disciplinary panels are a world unto themselves, operating in secret with scant accountability and limited protections for the accuser or the accused.

    At a time of great emotional turmoil, students who say they were assaulted must make a choice: Seek help from their school, turn to the criminal justice system or simply remain silent. The great majority — including the student in this case — choose their school, because of the expectation of anonymity and the belief that administrators will offer the sort of support that the police will not.

    Yet many students come to regret that decision, wishing they had never reported the assault in the first place.

    The New York Times, "Reporting Rape, And Wishing She Hadn’t" (via inothernews)

    (via andythanfiction)

    20 hours ago  /  2,178 notes  /  Source: inothernews

  5. eartheld:

mostly nature

    eartheld:

    mostly nature

    22 hours ago  /  8,793 notes  /  Source: calebbabcock

  6. electricshoebox:

    pomfcat:

    Such polite barks

    he gets up all excited the last time like YEAH I’M GONNA SPEAK YEAH WATCH THIS

    "…….wuf"

    (via ray-winters-sings)

    1 day ago  /  295,215 notes  /  Source: dualchainz

  7. benedictcumbershit:

learning-2love-myself:

tigg00bitties:

dynastylnoire:

tuejjlaz:

intoxicated-ambivalence:

downfalls:

Holy shit

holy shit

Holy shit.

tears

Relevant.

Oh my god.

shit

    benedictcumbershit:

    learning-2love-myself:

    tigg00bitties:

    dynastylnoire:

    tuejjlaz:

    intoxicated-ambivalence:

    downfalls:

    Holy shit

    holy shit

    Holy shit.

    tears

    Relevant.

    Oh my god.

    shit

    (via wild-nirvana)

    1 day ago  /  262,317 notes  /  Source: wordsbyms